Adoration is Back in Boston Print
Written by Sherry   
Wednesday, 12 August 2009 22:18
24/7 Eucharistic Adoration is returning to Boston on April 15 after a 40 year absence.

According to the Boston Pilot, St. Clement Eucharistic Shrine on Boylston Street will mark the start of adoration with a Mass celebrated by Cardinal Seán P. O’Malley on Aug. 15, the Solemnity of the Assumption.

"The effort to bring perpetual adoration back to Boston is a direct response to the call of Pope Benedict XVI to have spaces dedicated to prayers for vocations and the sanctity of priests during the Year for Priests which began in June and runs to June 2010. St. Clement’s will be the designated site in the Central Region of the archdiocese.

Van Damm said the inspiration for his involvement came from his own need to adore the Lord in the Eucharist. Van Damm said adoration has “re-ignited” his faith and given him much peace.

Marie Baranko, another member of the St. Clement’s community, agreed. Before she came to the shrine, Baranko said she did not believe in Christ’s presence in the Eucharist. Raised Catholic, she had never before seen adoration. After being invited to the shrine by a roommate, she attended adoration and recognized Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament.

“When you seek the truth, God honors that,” she said. “He reveals Himself to you.”

Her experience has also resulted in the discernment of her vocation. She will be entering the Sisters of Life order in September. She will be praying for the success of perpetual adoration at St. Clement’s from New York, she said.

“The shrine has played a major role in my vocation,” she said. “It’s centered around the Eucharist.”


Christ's Presence changes people.

We heard another amazing Real Presence story at Making Disciples two weeks ago. One of our participants is Catholic today because her local voting place was in the Catholic parish and she passed by the sanctuary and felt the Real Presence.

Just as I did as a completely clueless Protestant undergraduate when I stepped across the threshold of Blessed Sacrament Church in Seattle.

As did another Protestant women in Boise who attended an evangelization retreat at which the Eucharist was exposed and felt a force emanate from the host and hit her in the chest. I heard her story two weeks after she had been received into the Church.

Which is why we strongly suggest that Adoration is not a devotion just for the already devout. It can and should be made reverently accessible to all: non-Catholics, and non-anythings, the skeptical, doubting, the lapsed, the collapsed, and the seeking.

Because if He is lifted up, he will draw all men and women to Him.